Lovely Isomers
Lovely Isomers takes place at EMPAC's Theater, Saturday April 17th at 8pm. Admission FREE.

RPI Department of Arts presents Anna Lindemann and N F Chase's Lovely Isomers in a concert of eclectic sounds and visuals. The performance will feature Lindemann's work Bird Brain for ensemble, electronics and stop-motion animated video, and Chase's Ngoma Lungundu for multi-channel electronics and environmental video projection.

Anna Lindemann is a music composer who's work explores nature in its poignancy, absurdity, and complexity. Los Angeles expat N F Chase's music has been described as "The Rite of Spring meets Metallica" (L.A. Times) and probes the intersection between pop and the avant-garde.

Anna Lindemann has composed music for ballet, film, theater, and concert halls, and has received awards for her musical compositions from ASCAP, MTNA, Collage New Music, the Yale Sudler Fund for the Creative and Performing Arts, and the Yale Music Department. Lindemann graduated from Yale College with a degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology where she conducted field research on bird calls and bird speciation in Indonesia, and studied genes involved in the patterning of butterfly wings during development. Lindemann’s work integrates her passion for multidisciplinary art and biology. Information about Anna Lindemann may be found at www.askewmusic.com.

Dubbed by L.A. Weekly as an "Eye/Ear Explorer", N F Chase's music has been performed internationally by the likes of the California EAR Unit, Southwest Chamber Music, New Zealand's 175 East, Long Beach Opera and the Philadelphia Classical Symphony. His electro-acoustic composition has been featured at Stanford University's Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA), at the Van Abbemuseum in Eindhoven, Holland, and as part of the Weimar/New York festival in Weimar, Germany. Chase is founder of the Musical Art/Sound Laboratory (Chase Ateliers) whose trans-disciplinary work has been exhibited in festivals across the US and Europe. Chase's work with improvising trio NIRUSU III has been acclaimed by the L.A. Weekly as "pushing the edge of audio/visual improv," while his interactive audio/visual composition Transmission was featured with the Illuminated Corridor's NOVA at the 2008 Whitney Biennial. Information about Nicholas Chase may be found at www.nicholaschase.net.

Founded by Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, EMPAC has been hailed by the New York Times as a “technological pleasure dome for the mind and senses … dedicated to the marriage of art and science as it has never been done before.” EMPAC offers artists, scholars, researchers, engineers, designers, and audiences opportunities for creative exploration that are available nowhere else under a single roof. Lovely Isomers at EMPAC is sponsored by the RPI Arts Department.

Lovely Isomers brings Lindemann and Chase together on the EMPAC Theater stage where the two will present their diverse and unusual audio/visual compositions.

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Bird Brain
Lindemann's multimedia Bird Brain combines stop motion animation and video with music for soprano, cello, clarinet, and electronics that unites simple melodies and funky avant-garde rhythms. The piece unfolds as a male bird builds a bower of butterflies to attract a mate, while a female bird tends to her nest atop a kitchen stove. We see glimpses into the biology of these creatures as butterfly wings develop and pasta mitosis animates the growth of the incubating egg. But what will become of the birds when humans parasitize their world to make outlandish hats? 

Bird Brain unfolds as a male bird builds a bower of butterflies to attract a mate, while a female bird tends to her nest atop a kitchen stove. We see glimpses into the biology of these creatures as butterfly wings develop and pasta mitosis animates the growth of the incubating egg. But what will become of the birds when humans parasitize their world to make outlandish hats?
 
Bird Brain combines animation, stop motion, and video with music scored for soprano, cello, clarinet, and electronics that unites simple melodies and funky avant-garde rhythms.

Performers' Bios
Damian Blättler is a graduate student in music theory at Yale University, where he is working on a dissertation dealing with additive harmonic structures in French Impressionism.  Originally from Boston, he received his A.B. in Music from Harvard University in 2006.  He is also active as a clarinet performer and teacher, having performed recently with Orchestra New England and the Albano Ballet among others, and teaching music in the New Haven public schools through the Yale School of Music's outreach program.

Scott McCreary is a student of Ole Akahoshi at the Yale School of Music. He studied with Einar Holm (Ithaca College) and David Ying (Eastman) prior to matriculation at Yale University where he is a Neuropsychology major. At fourteen he made his solo debut with the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra, and as an orchestral musician he has served as the principal cellist of several nationally recognized ensembles, including the Honor Orchestra of America, the New York State All-State Orchestra, and the Yale Symphony Orchestra. As a chamber musician, he has been invited to the Quartet Program with Charlie Castleman, the Robert McDuffie Festival for Strings, and Kathie Johnson's Bay Chamber Music Institute, and his piano quartet was the winner of the Syracuse Friends of Chamber Music Competition. 

 Lucy Fitz Gibbon is a senior at Yale University majoring in music and completing her pre-med requirements. Her particular areas of interest lie in new and early music, and she is currently completing an intensive major in music with a paper on Cavalli’s La Calisto and contemporary Venetian culture. At Yale she sings with the Yale Schola Cantorum and has also appeared with the Yale Baroque Opera Project, Yale Opera, Opera Theater of Yale College, Yale Collegium, and Yale Glee Club. Performances this spring include Barber’s Knoxville: Summer of 1915; Schoenberg’s Pierrot Lunaire with a Yale School of Music Ensemble; and the eponymous Deidamia in Sacrati’s La Finta Pazza with the Yale Baroque Opera Project. 

 
    Excerpts from Bird Brain  
   
 
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Ngoma Lungundu (Voice That Thunders)
The Ngoma Lungundu is a mythical/mystical drum carried and guarded by the Lemba people of Africa. Recent controversial research by anthropologist Dr. Tudor Parfitt (University of London School of Oriental and African Studies), draws connection between the Ngoma Lungundu and the Arc of the Covenant, inspired by the recent discovery that the Lemba are, in fact, physical descendants of the lost tribe of Israelites known as the Cohen. The Cohen were the guardians of the Arc and, based on this and the specific mythical similarities of the Ngoma Lungundu and the Biblical Arc of the Covenant, Dr. Parfitt asserts that the Ngoma Lungundu and the Arc may be one and the same. Dr. Parfitt has found the most recent incarnation of the Ngoma Lungundu, dated at about 650 years of age, at the Harare Museum of Human Science in Zimbabwe. Be it Arc of the Covenant or not, the Ngoma Lungundu seems to refer to a particular style of drum that has been created and recreated repeatedly by the Lemba tribesman as an icon of religious faith and military might in very much the same way that the Arc of the Covenant is referred to in ancient texts and Old Testament of the Bible. The Lemba, incidentally (and enigmatically), practice Judaism.

Ngoma Lungundu (Voice That Thunders) is inspired by the idea of a drum that speaks with with the absolute voice of Nature, a call-to-being, as it were. Ngoma Lungundu integrates 4-channel, spatialized sound and interactive video into an experiential, musical environment. Sequences of live action film, hand-drawn animation and vector graphics are being combined, layered, shaped, and manipulated in real-time response to the sound/music of Ngoma and form the choreographic element of what is, essentially, a dance piece with no dancers.

 
    Excerpt from Ngoma Lungundu  
   



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